HISTORICAL FACT AND FICTION AL ATTAS EPUB DOWNLOAD

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Author: Syed Muhammad Naquib al-Attas. Published: by Penerbit UTM Press. Historical Fact And cresadtgehomual.gq Historical Fact And cresadtgehomual.gq In this book. Download Al-Attas's 'Islam and Secularism' from here About the Author Syed Muhammad al Historical Fact and Fiction by Syed Muhammad Naquib al-Attas and a great HISTORICAL FACT AND FICTION AL ATTAS PDF - chooselove. live. New site ePUB or Aple ago in their explanation and interpretation of historical Historical Fact And Fiction ↠ Author ✓ Syed Muhammad Naquib al-Attas.


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Topics: said naquib al attas islam and secularism malaysian scholars relevant islamic literature philosophy islamic pdf download and the establishment of a truly Islamic university was in fact provided for the first time in He was exposed to Malay literature, history, religion, and western classics in English. Syed Muhammad Naquib al Attas Historical Fact and Fiction Kuala Lumpur from 95 Akhir sekali, al-Attas juga merupakan pemikir Islam yang bertanggungjawab . Interested in SEJARAH cresadtgehomual.gq? Download the Android app. Syed Muhammad Naquib al-Attas, Historical Fact and Fiction (Johor Bah- ru: Universiti Teknologi Malaysia Press, ). 5. Mona Abaza, Debates on Islam and.

Paterson, C.

Blagden and G. Drewes about the inscriptions on the Terengganu stone.

To al-Attas, such doubts are:. The other problem with orientalism, according to al- Attas, is the decoupling of the Arabian-Islamic influences in Malay life and thought. Because the orientalists saw many things through Indic spectacles and regarded developments in the Malay world as largely shaped by influences from India, they refused to acknowledge the roles of other figures and collectives that played an equal or greater role in the making of Islamic communities.

By doing this, the orientalists sought to downplay the importance of words and terms adopted from the Arabic lexicon into the Malay language and pave the way for the creation of a language that is free from Islamic elements.

Proceeding from that basis, the orientalists argue that Islam would not have made much of an impact in the Malay world and that the momentum of its spread would not have been quickened if not for the presence of the Europeans who came to institutionalise their ideas and practice of colonial mercantilism and secular values. In other words, the Europeans and not the Muslim missionaries were vital factors in laying the conditions for Islam to flourish.

The orientalists couched Malay literature as consisting of poems, romance, epics, or folklore meant for mere entertainment. Because of this, they could not discern that these works functioned as missionary texts just as they were a source of relaxation and enjoyment of the listeners.

Al-Attas, Preliminary Statement, His antidote to orientalism lies instead in transcending the limits of orientalist thought by reconstructing the histories of Islam and Muslims in the Malay world. This requires a few steps and, with these moves, al-Attas provides us with the means, even if in relatively unelaborated forms, by which the history of Islam in the Malay world could be rescued from the orientalists. In the same vein, al-Attas did not share the view among many critics that orientalism was a necessarily European phenomenon or that orientalists shared common attitudes There is nothing ethnic about orientalism except for the fact that the practitioners of that form of knowledge share common epistemological starting points—secularism and the assumption that the Orient is inferior—which characterise most but not all Western scholarship.

The effacement of vital facts and memories of Islam and Muslims, the excessive scepticism towards indigenous perspectives and sources and the obsession with the exotic, as well as the belief in the regressiveness of the Orientals and the tainting of theories with settled aversion towards Islam forms the essential rubrics of the Orientalist endeavour.

Orientalism is to be rejected and corrected only when its errors get in the way of a true depiction of Malay- Islamic society and history. The works of orientalists must be credited in instances when they exhibit a perceptive and in-depth understanding of the histories of the Islam. Al-Attas, Historical Fact and Fiction, xiii. Arberry, Mortimer Wheeler, and Richard Winstedt.

In the first few pages of Historical Fact and Fiction, al-Attas wrote at length that: European historians of the Malay Archipelago comprising prehistorians, ethnologists, archeolo- gists, philologists, sociologists and other scholars belonging to the social sciences, have meticulous- ly researched and brilliantly elaborated their cogent findings with such diligent and inspiring scholarship that evokes due praise.

We much sincerely acknowledge their wonderful intellectual contributions and affirm what is true in their interpretation of our history which they have gradually set in the crucible agreed among themselves. To theorise, according to al-Attas, is not to engage in mere conjecture or speculation, which is prevalent among a select group of scholars.

Theories are supposed to be verifiable but not irrefutably verified. Any effort at theorising about the processes of Islamisation must begin with the premise that the spread of the faith was unique in its own way and should not be spuriously compared with other religions that came prior to it or other ideologies that came after. Islam first laid its roots in the hearts and minds of the Malays.

It follows then that a theorist of Islamisation must understand first the exceptional nature and unique character of the coming and spread of Islam.

It is exceptional because, unlike the propagation of Hinduism and Buddhism in the Malay World, which led only to the conversion of the literary elites whose acceptance of those faiths was only skin-deep, Islam brought about a mass Al-Attas, Historical Fact and Fiction, xi. Al-Attas views these theories as problematic because they consist of value-driven judgements.

Historical Fact And Fiction

Influenced by such theories, Malaysian scholars promoted a developmentalist and evolutionary theory of Islamisation. In brief, proponents of this theory believed that all societies move from one stage to another in a linear fashion, that is, from the traditional or primitive stage to a modern and industrialised era. Islamisation in the Malay world is couched as a transitory stage to modernity, a supposition which al-Attas plainly rejects, as we shall see later. According to al-Attas, It seems to me that before one can formulate any theory—historical or otherwise—one must, on the basis of the facts gathered from what one knows and on the basis of inferences and implications about the Al-Attas, Preliminary Statement.

Al-Attas, Historical Fact and Fiction, xiv.

The method he advocates in analysing these varied sources is by way of semantic analysis of the concepts used in these texts. Beyond that, it is only proper for a historian to compare Arabian, Persian, Chinese, Al-Attas, Preliminary Statement, 2.

Historical Fact And Fiction

The vocabulary and terminologies found in the Malay language expanded with the mass conversion of the Malay literati into Islam. In fact, the language was transformed into becoming a vehicle for philosophical discourse and this had inspired the founding of new forms of creative writing and upgraded the use of Malay from the language of seamen and the market to the language of scholars and the learned.

Other consequences of the transformation in the Malay language were the change in the naming of days and months in the calendar used by the Malays and the adoption of terms and writing styles derived from the Arabic script.

Empat salasilah yang disertakan pada lampiran buku ini sangat signifikan bagi pengkaji mahupun peminat sejarah kerana amat sedikit ilmuan yang mengkaji secara terperinci akan kemasukan Islam ke Benua Asia lebih-lebih lagi di Nusantara Melayu.

Usaha-usaha pengkajian manuskrip ini wajar disokong dalam menjernihkan semula identiti dan asal-usul agama dan bangsa Melayu.

Buku ini agak baik bagi mengetahui asas-asas sejarah di Kepulauan Melayu berbanding buku Membongkar Rahsia Dunia Melayu kerana jalan penulisan penulis di sini walaupun lebih bersifat akademik dan mempunyai sumber rujukan yang pelbagai, ianya lebih mesra pembaca.

I definitive new way of looking at the history of my country. May 07, Amin Ashari rated it really liked it I am deeply intrigued by the content of the book, even more so on Prof Syed Muhammad Naquib's methodology which combines empirical facts with intellectual reason to determine the historical events that took place in the Malay Archipelago hundreds of years ago. The essays on Parameswara, Sumatra, Malacca and the spread of Islam by systematic da'wah of the Hadrami Arabs who were descendents of the Prophet PBUH were critically researched and presented in this book.

With that as the preface, one should prepare beforehand for plenty of historical references and also a shift in perspectives conventional history has given us. For myself, I find myself at odds with what to feel about this work. It is largely an academic exercise in genealogical study that has a good huge chapter dedicated to it.

It would be difficult to believe that Historical Fact and Fiction was not written without an Islamic agenda in mind. While the premise of Islam's genesis in Southeast Asia is up for debate, this is not a book you'd read for pleasure.I definitive new way of looking at the history of my country.

ISBN 13: 9789835207891

Istilah nama-nama Muslim di Tanah Melayu iv. Proceeding from that basis, the orientalists argue that Islam would not have made much of an impact in the Malay world and that the momentum of its spread would not have been quickened if not for the presence of the Europeans who came to institutionalise their ideas and practice of colonial mercantilism and secular values. See Wan Mohd. Since there is no science that is free of value, we must intelligently investigate and study the values and judgments that are inherent in, or aligned to, the presuppositions and interpretations of modern science.

His entire career has been dedicated to correcting the errors committed by a select group of Orientalists and their problematic attempts at explaining the venture of Islam in the region.

Al-Attas also says that the Essentialist and the Existentialists schools of the Islamic tradition address the nature of reality. Any effort at theorising about the processes of Islamisation must begin with the premise that the spread of the faith was unique in its own way and should not be spuriously compared with other religions that came prior to it or other ideologies that came after. Such essentialising is a lynchpin of orientalism, and it obfuscates the realities and complex of Islamisation, according to al-Attas.

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